Ignition and Starter Switch Relocation

June 23, 2018 modifications

 

With the simplification of the dash I wanted to find a new spot for the keyed ignition switch as well as starter button. I decided under the seat made the best sense… but now I had to figure out a way to achieve this relocation. The factory switch is bulky with several positions (lock, off, on, park). It also has a built in fork lock mechanism that obviously can only engage when mounted in the original spot on the crown. I wanted to reduce the complexity of they key switch and downsize the footprint. (You can see how I removed the OEM key switch here)

 

OEM key switch in all it’s bulky glory…

 

First step was to locate a new key switch. I chose one of the many “universal” four pin switches available on Ebay. As most cheap electronic devices found on that site there are seldom instructions or a wiring diagram of any sort included. After some testing with a multimeter I determined one pair of wires was connected with the switch off, the other connected with the switch on. The problem was the OEM switch had seven pins with two switch positions. I needed to drastically simplify the wiring.

 

Simple four pin key switch diagram…

 

I decided to delete the “PARK” position on the OEM key switch. The main function of this position is to be able to walk away from the bike with the steering column locked and the running lights on. The indicators also remain hot so one may choose to leave the turn signals flashing. With those functions dropped I only had to wire for the “ON” switch position. However, I decided to make it so the turn signals would always be hot, regardless of key position. This would allow me to leave the bike with hazards flashing if I ever chose to. The downside might be accidentally leaving a flasher on with the bike parked, so that would be on my memory to solve. For longer term storage, I would simply pull the 10A fuse controlling the signal light circuit which would prevent accidental switch activation.

 

Seven down to four…

 

When “ON”, the key switch sends 12V to the headlight, tail light, ignition and horn circuits. The tail light fuse sends 12v back through the key switch which in turn sends it out to the running lights. In addition, the key switch sends 12v to the turn signal circuit. The now deleted “PARK” position connected a second 12v lead only to the turn signals.¬†This now meant I only had two wires needing to be connected to the new universal key switch. Constant 12V in, and switched 12V out feeding the¬†headlight, tail light, ignition and horn circuits. This would in turn feed the running lights with the new permanent harness connection I was to make. One final issue was to overcome the OHM restricted security ignition wire located within the factory key switch.

I would go into detail as to how I resolved the resistor security issue but being that this will be posted online for many different eyes to see, I will keep the actual process vague. Basically, you have to determine how to feed the igniter the correct amount of resistance so it knows the proper key is in the ignition and the bike can start. I resolved this by permanently creating a circuit outside of the ignition switch itself that reused the factory resistor. This kept me with the two wires required instead of the seven on the OEM key switch.

Now to source and find a place for the new starter button. Even though I had retained the factory controls, the OEM starter switch had been acting very intermittent. Probably caused from worn contacts or loose wiring. I looked for a waterproof button of reasonable size to replace it. I thought it would be a nice feature for it to illuminate when the key was turned to the “ON” position as it might be harder to find in it’s new location once dark. Plus it would look cool. I located a 32mm hole in the frame that almost looked like it was created just for this reason. The problem was the biggest start button I could find was 19mm. To make up the difference, I sourced a seal with an ID of 19mm and a OD or 32mm. Bingo, problem solved.

 

Button and seal…

 

Button and seal assembled…

 

Next was to run switched 12v from the new key switch through the LED illumination on the starter button. I then rewired the old starter button circuit through the new switch and eliminated the old button from the OEM controls. This would make the new button illuminate every time the key was in the “ON” position.

 

Start button wiring configuration…

 

From there, I needed to run the necessary wires to the back of the bike and pull them through the factory frame hole.

 

Almost as if designed just for it…

 

After I made the switch connections, I pressed in the new seal surrounding the starter button. It was a tight fit but seals like this are designed to compress and bite so the button really locked into place and looked clean once installed. Next step will be to make a spot for the new key switch under the seat. I will plan to weld a bracket for this to the new seat rail I will be fabricating.

 

Finished switch…

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